Dive, Dove, ..?

Have you ever avoided using a word because you weren’t quite sure if it was correct?

        

Yes, it’s dive – dove – dived.

 

 

        

About these ads

About Boggleton Drive

I teach things to people and sometimes draw comics.
This entry was posted in Grammar Comics! and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

51 Responses to Dive, Dove, ..?

  1. if i don’t know a word i usually just wing it with all the multiple options and question marks
    dive? dove? doved? dived?

  2. Haha, very relevant as just last night I considered avoiding using the past participle of “ride” and “drink” in a blog ‘coz it just looked weird but in the name of good grammar, I conceded…

  3. Very good. Now does this hold true for scuba diving as well? Just asking, as I am a dive instructor and it would be rather embarrassing to get this one wrong ;-)

  4. Russ Nickel says:

    I always correct my friends on this one, and they don’t believe me. I also don’t think they appreciate it very much haha. And just like with Sharon’s comment, none of them knows about “I have drunk…”

    • I know! Seems like all those past participles than contain a “u” (sung, swum, drunk, begun, rung, etc) are never used. The worst I hear on a semi-frequent basis is “I would have went…” Ugh.

  5. merry203 says:

    Hahaha. It happens to me, even in Spanish. Languages can be complicated =P

  6. Jacob Spire says:

    Actually had me laughing!
    I usually end up using workarounds…
    “What a dive! Have you ever… um… Oh, do you like playing chess?”
    Awesome blog!

  7. LMAO I’m an EFL writer so I’m all up in grammar rules every single working day of my life. But there are times when I get confused, too, because of too much info in my head. Love this strip!

  8. I’m still confused with awake – awoke – awaken(?)/awoken(?)! /csb

    • Shudder. I know what you mean. There are actually THREE verbs that are all pretty similar (for all intents and purposes often identical) but conjugate differently.

      Wake-woke-waken
      awake-awoke-awoken
      awaken-awakened-awakened

      AND don’t forget “awake” is also an adjective.

      English is messed up.

      • Thanks for clearing that up! So, it turns out, awaken is a completely separate verb. O.O Other online lessons never really cleared that up. They just dove right into it. No wonder it was confusing.

      • “dove right into it,” nice. 5/5

        Yeah, it’s bizarre, really. I generally use “awaken” for things more grandiose than just waking up. “Steve has awakened! He passed out on my couch again” sounds a little too over the top to me.

  9. This may be one of those rules I have to write on a blackboard 500 times until it sinks in! Congrats on all the followers – that’s got to be exciting!

  10. Yes I have. If I don’t know how to use a word, I’ll use another one.

  11. R.J. Foster says:

    Just discovered Boggleton Drive, and I love it! A Wordsmith myself, I really enjoy the way you illustrate common, yet often complicated grammatical concepts so simply. Your strip is as elegant as it is entertaining. Keep ‘em coming!

  12. When I was teaching writing at a university, I once had a student assert that “diven” was the correct choice. In his mind:

    drive -> drove -> driven

    dive -> dove -> diven

    Awesome, right?

  13. the waiting says:

    Your illustration completely encapsulates the way my little brain works. And I have thusly (a word?) updated my database about the correct conjugation of “to dive.” Thank you! Your updates are much more seamless than Microsoft’s.

  14. C. L. Blacke says:

    Love these grammar lessons! Can you address the proper use of anxious and eager as well? That’s my pet peeve.

  15. kvetchmom says:

    Yes! My vocabulary has improved so much as a result of my avoiding dive, dove, lay, lie, etc. Love your blog!

  16. The Pencil Pirouette says:

    Real LOL moment! and I don’t even like using LOL in my sentences! Ah, the laguange purist in us all.

  17. ahahha always a pleasure coming here to correct my grammar.. i thought about you while i was writing this article where i had to use “flair” ..
    “flair of the dress”
    i accidently wrote flare. and then i thought. eeek. a dress on fire. =p

  18. Bindu says:

    Wondering how to deal with these ‘irregular’ ones and make them ‘regular’!! If I fail I’ll remove them from the rolls. I resort to ‘when in doubt cut it out’ technology at times.

    Very interesting. Liked the way you pictured the brain’s search for the right word.

  19. Hi Boggleton

    It is very heartening to see the way you have combined your love for the language with this art form
    I had planned to do something similar with my blog but I have stuck to just writing so far

    500 followers is great motivation, see you next time

  20. Your teaching method has a way of sinking in! Love your blog. I thought I would pass it along and let you know just how great I think it is. These awards are for you:
    http://changedbychange.com/2011/11/29/from-the-jury-of-my-peers-my-first-blogging-awards/

  21. olletron says:

    I do get this, sadly. I am shamefully not as grammatically perfect as I would like to be :<

  22. Smart Guy says:

    Fuck, I wish my brain was like that. I linked you on reddit, check it out: http://www.reddit.com/r/humor

  23. Chilli Ninja says:

    Very very funny blog. Really enjoying popping by for a regular giggle.

  24. adafa says:

    This is wrong. Dove is also a correct form. Dived is the older, traditional form more common with the older generation, but dove has come into use and is accepted.

    • Interesting that you made an account just to post this.
      In North America, common (and accepted) usage is dive-dove-dived. People often get this verb conjugation mixed up (doven? diven? etc). I do not know whether you are referring to the simple past or the past participle when you say “dove is also a correct form”. If you are referring to the simple past, then yes, I agree with you, and it is stated in my post (dive-dove-dived). If you are referring to the past participle, i.e. that “dove’ is a correct form of the p.p., then you are only correct on a purely descriptive level.
      Regardless, I’m still not sure how I was wrong originally.

  25. Pingback: Accept vs. Except « Boggleton Drive

Say stuff!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s